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#2712 - 03/21/11 06:23 PM Re: Television 2010-11
Barbara Offline
Administrator

Registered: 04/24/99
Posts: 13033
Loc: Citrus Heights, CA , US
Will anybody miss the cheerleaders from TAR? I'm glad the Goths were able to come back; his restraint was admirable when she lost her fannypack. I hope that wasn't just the editing.

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#2713 - 03/27/11 03:25 PM Re: Television 2010-11
Rita Offline


Registered: 09/22/04
Posts: 3264
Loc: St. Paul, MN
Is anyone besides me watching Harry's Law? It's not a show I look forward to eagerly, but I do end up enjoying every episode I've seen. Kathy Bates is wonderful.

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#2714 - 03/31/11 11:17 AM Re: Television 2010-11
Lorna Offline
Member

Registered: 04/22/05
Posts: 2676
Loc: Dayton, Ohio
I like it as long as Kathy Bates is on the screen, but the rest of the time it's not very interesting, IMO.

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#2715 - 04/01/11 03:20 PM Re: Television 2010-11
Barbara Offline
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Registered: 04/24/99
Posts: 13033
Loc: Citrus Heights, CA , US
It's about that way for me, too. I especially like the scenes Harry plays with whatever man is guesting. The Tommy Jefferson character, clearly modeled on Denny Crane in Boston Legal. And that schlub of an ex-lover who won Harry's respect with an impassioned speech worthy of Alan Shore. And finally that twerp prosecutor who's beginning to look like something more than Harry's Hamilton Burger.

But the regular supporting cast -- blah. Cliché characters saying cliché things. Dump 'em all, sez I.

I didn't see the first episode; I know Harry was fired from her cushy job, but why? And how did she end up practicing law in a shoestore?

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#2716 - 04/04/11 09:50 AM Re: Television 2010-11
Rita Offline


Registered: 09/22/04
Posts: 3264
Loc: St. Paul, MN
Harry suffered a burnout, realizing after 38 years that patent law is boring. She's smoking pot and watching Woody Woodpecker when her boss comes in and fires her. She's barely left the building when a man falls on her, an attempted suicide who'd jumped from the building. Harry wakes up in the hospital with nothing more serious than a mild concussion. When she leaves the hospital, she sees a For Rent sign across the street. But she's just stepped off the curb when she's hit by a car.

She wakes up in the hospital again, but this time she's able to make it to the For Rent place. It's an abandoned shoestore, well stocked with expensive designer shoes. Harry's secretary (Jenna) persuades Harry to keep the shoes, as a potential source of much-needed income. The wannabe suicide (Malcolm) wants Harry to represent him in court on a drug charge; he stays on to work as a paralegal. The driver of the car that hit her shows up (Adam, a lawyer). He wants to work out of her office temporarily, to help her get established as a way of making up for hitting her with her car. But in spite of the rough neighborhood, he decides to stay. Three gangbangers show up and attempt to shake Harry down for protection money. She tells them that if they really will protect her, she'll provide them with free legal service when they get arrested. They accept.

Um, come to think of it, I'm not sure the gangbangers were in the pilot episoe...they may have come later. Anyway, that's how Harry's new "family" was assembled.

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#2717 - 04/05/11 03:30 AM Re: Television 2010-11
Barbara Offline
Administrator

Registered: 04/24/99
Posts: 13033
Loc: Citrus Heights, CA , US
Ohhh, the blond is Harry's secretary! I thought she came with the shoes (sharing space and expenses). I don't remember seeing her do anything secretarial.

Anybody watch cable's Spring Spectaculars this weekend? I found Starz's Camelot disappointing. The dialogue is generally clunky, sprinkled with occasional bits of modern idiom ("Good luck with that!"). Some of the changes to the legend are a bit puzzling (Guinevere betrothed to another knight, for instance). Merlin is more political manipulator than wizard; as played by Ralph Fiennes, he looks like an unkempt Christopher Meloni (Eliot in L&O:SVU). The biggest disappointment is Arthur, shown here as a libidinous teenager badly in need of a shampoo. The only cast member with any real presence is Eva Green as Morgan. Oddly, I'd thought she was the only weak link in Casino Royale; she was too young and too, well, green for the role she played. But she's matured in the years since then, and she makes an impressive Morgan.

As far as spectacle goes, Showtime's The Borgias wins, hands down. Rich, rich visuals in this $45 million production -- but with a somewhat impoverished content. The life story of the Borgias is so complex, so multi-layered, that any dramatization is forced to simplify. But so many intriguing matters are left out to make room for as many sex scenes as can be crowded in that the plotting, the double-dealing, the bloody ruthlessness of the family are given short shrift. Jeremy Irons is a believable Roderigo Borgia / Pope Alexander VI, a nice mixture of aristocratic cold-bloodedness and humane love for his illegitimate family.

Until its own spectacle airs (Game of Thrones, April 17), HBO is making do with Mildred Pierce. This production follows the James M. Cain novel more closely than the Joan Crawford movie did. It's still soap opera, but it's pretty good soap opera. Kate Winslet will probably win all sorts of acting awards.

Reelz is showing The Kennedys. This is the series The History Channel commissioned but then declined to show because: 1) the Kennedy family pressured them to drop it, or 2) it has so many historical inaccuracies. I suppose those two reasons might not be mutually exclusive. Tom Wilkinson as Joe Kennedy is his usual marvelous self; he has the Boston accent down pat. The rest of the first double episode I found flat and uninteresting. It reminded me of all those quickie biopics TV used to show so much back in the 70s.

For my money, AMC's The Killing has them all beat. One of the problems with one-hour crime dramas is that there's not enough time to show the consequences of violent death other than the police investigation. The Killing takes the time. A young girl is killed, and slowly and with restraint, we're shown the emotional effect of the killing on three groups of people -- the police, the girl's family, and the suspects. This is not a murder-every-week show; 13 episodes are devoted to this one crime. No flash, no gun battles, no witty cop banter. The Killing is quiet and intelligent, and utterly absorbing. I can easily do without any of the other shows I've mentioned here, but I'll not be missing The Killing.

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#2718 - 04/05/11 04:18 AM Re: Television 2010-11
Anonymous
Unregistered


The Killing has caused quite a stir over here, and the Faroese can't turn out enough Lund-style woolly jumpers to satisfy demand. It's been shown on Saturday nights on BBC4 - two one-hour episodes every week. It can be a bit confusing, with new suspects turning up in every episode and then disappearing again (often because they've died), plus lots of political manoeuvering over the City Hall election, but it's certainly been addictive (and very dark most of the time). Incidentally, I fingered the killer at quite an early stage, something I'm generally not very good at.

Danish seems a much stranger language than Swedish. I've now seen three different Inspector Wallanders in television series (of whom Kenneth Branagh was by far the least satisfactory) and got used to the sound of Swedish, which seems to use a lot of borrowings from English. Danish had hardly any and sounded odder.

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#2719 - 04/05/11 09:09 AM Re: Television 2010-11
Pete Offline


Registered: 01/10/02
Posts: 5177
Loc: Newport News, Virginia, USA
Strange--One of the Norse languages helped create Old English, to start with (along with Anglo-Saxon), I thought. Various grammatical features of English are derived from the Vikings who took over central Britain, and against whom Alfred and his successors fought and eventually won.

I have read that the European language closest to modern English is Frisian. I know that when I used to listen to SW radio while I was in the USN, that Radio Nederland used to broadcast at times in a language that sounded like English (but wasn't).
_________________________
Regerds, Pete

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#2720 - 04/05/11 03:44 PM Re: Television 2010-11
Anonymous
Unregistered


Here in York, once the capital of a Viking kingdom (I think they came from Denmark or thereabouts - possibly Schleswig-Holstein), a lot of the oldest streets within the city walls have names ending in -gate: Micklegate, Petergate, Colliergate, Coppergate, Stonegate, Fossgate, Monkgate, Jubbergate, Whipmawhopmagate (yes, really!), Swinegate, Ousegate, Bishopgate, etc. Oh, and Walmgate (where I live in a building beneath which the archaeologists found evidence of Viking habitation). I'm pretty certain that -gate signifies Scandinavian origin: in Sweden, a lot of street names end in -gatan, or so it seems from reading Henning Mankel and Stieg Larsson. Dunno about Norway.

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#2721 - 04/05/11 11:52 PM Re: Television 2010-11
Barbara Offline
Administrator

Registered: 04/24/99
Posts: 13033
Loc: Citrus Heights, CA , US
Andrew, it sounds as if you watched the original version, Forbrydelsen (with subtitles?). What I saw is a new American version, set in Seattle. I don't know how similar or different the two are.

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