Titles from A MIDSUMMER NIGHT'S DREAM

A Midsummer Night's Dream
Peaseblossom? Cobweb? Moth?
Arthur Rackham: Puck and a Fairy



(Allusion to title)

Bottom surrounded by fairies
Henry Fuseli: Titania, Bottom and the Fairies
John Heston Willey: Midsummer Nights with
the Great Dreamer

K. M. Peyton: A Midsummer Night's Death
Gordon Bromley: A Midsummer Night's
Trevor Barnes: A Midsummer Night's Killing
Robert F. Baylus: A Midsummer Night's
Murder

Lee Crosby: A Midsummer Night's Murder
Ware Budlong: Midsummer Night's Murder
Jill Barnett, et alia: Midsummer Night's
Madness

Elizabeth Shenkin: Midsummer's Nightmare
Frances Moyer Stevens: Midsummer
Nightmare
And ere a man hath power to say 'Behold!'
The jaws of darkness do devour it up:
So quick bright things come to confusion. (I,i)
Mark Cross: Jaws of Darkness
That would hang us, every mother's son. (I,ii) Norman Lindsay: Every Mother's Son
Judith Arcana: Every Mother's Son
Annie D. Le Claire: Every Mother's Son
(Allusion to stage direction, II,i) Denis Mackail: Another Part of the Wood
Ill met by moonlight, proud Titania. (II,i) Leslie Ford: Ill Met by Moonlight
W. Stanley Moss: Ill Met by Moonlight
And the imperial votaress passed on,
In maiden meditation, fancy-free. (II,i)
Sydney Carroll: The Imperial Votaress
I'll put a girdle round about the earth
In forty minutes. (II,i)

Titania and Oberon
Francis Danby: Scene from A Midsummer Night's Dream

Bath Festival Society: A Girdle Round
About the Earth: Astronomical &
Geographical Discovery, 1460-1630

Maria Aitken: A Girdle Round the Earth
D. N. Richardson: A Girdle Round the Earth
Hugh Barty-King: Girdle Round the Earth:
Story of Cable and Wireless and Its
Predecessors
Never harm
Nor spell nor charm,
Come our lovely lady nigh. (II,ii)
Alicen White: Nor Spell Nor Charm
A crew of patches, rude mechanicals. (III,ii) Nora Ratcliff: Rude Mechanicals
Lord, what fools these mortals be! (III,ii) Francis Boon: Lord, What Fools
Edward Bacon: Lord, What Fools
Bernard Travaille: What Fools These Mortals Be
Methought I was enamour'd of an ass. (IV,i) Barron's Education Series: Enamoured of an
Ass
I never heard
So musical a discord, such sweet thunder. (IV,i)
John Blunsden: Such Sweet Thunder
Peter Nicholson: Such Sweet Thunder
I have had a most rare vision. (IV,i) Eileen Wallis: A Most Rare Vision
I will get Peter Quince to write a ballad of this dream; it shall be called Bottom's Dream, because it hath no bottom. (IV,i) John Updike: Bottom's Dream
The lunatic, the lover and the poet
Are of imagination all compact:
. . .
The poet's eye, in a fine frenzy rolling,
Doth glance from heaven to earth, from earth to
heaven;
And as imagination bodies forth
The forms of things unknown, the poet's pen
Turns them to shapes and gives to airy nothing
A local habitation and a name. (V,i)
Ralph L. Finn: The Lunatic, the Lover, and
the Poet

Noel Woodein: A Fine Frenzy
Robert Baylor, comp.: A Fine Frenzy
Herbert Read: Forms of Things Unknown
Mark Stavig: Forms of Things Unknown
Walter Sawyer: A Local Habitation
Ellen Kay: A Local Habitation
Norman Nicholson: A Local Habitation
Guy Butler: A Local Habitation
John Frederick Nims: A Local Habitation
A tedious brief scene of young Pyramus
And his love Thisbe; very tragical mirth.
Merry and tragical! Tedious and brief!
That is, hot ice and wondrous strange snow. (V,i)
Guy Sprung: Hot Ice
Ross Angel: Hot Ice
Robert J. Casey: Hot Ice
Al W. Clark: Hot Ice
Leo Grex: Hot Ice
Henry Seymour: Hot Ice
Robert Derek Steeley: Hot Ice
Simon Waldron: Hot Ice
Nora Roberts: Hot Ice
Steve Metcalfe: Strange Snow
His speech was like a tangled chain; nothing impaired, but all disordered. (V,i) Ruth A. Fox: A Tangled Chain



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Last updated July 17, 2000.